Invoking a historic quotation by his father, King Vajiralongkorn has released an announcement on the eve of the election saying that voters should support ‘good people’ to rule Thailand.
Students and international environmentalists have joined a strike in Chiang Mai to show solidarity with the Fridays for Future movement. Just before the strike, Chiang Mai became one of the worst cities in the world in terms of air quality. The movement has been pressuring the Chiang Mai Governor to address air pollution, but the administration has still not taken serious action.
The leaders of the now dissolved Thai Raksa Chart (TRC) party started campaigning for democracy right after Constitutional Court decision. Its members have thrown their support behind other political parties, including the Future Forward Party (FFP) and Pheu Tham, and even campaigned for a ‘no’ vote. Confused, the Election Commission of Thailand (ECT) has set up an investigative committee to see if they have violated any rules.
Overseas voting for the upcoming 2019 general election began on 4 March and will continue until 16 March. However, many Thai voters living overseas are facing difficulties casting their votes in UK, US, China, Malaysia, Canada, South Africa, Russia, and Japan, from long waiting times at the poll to ballots not arriving in the mail.
Al Jazeera’s and the BBC's news broadcast on True Visions cable TV momentarily stopped on 7 and 8 March. It is currently not confirmed which story was cut.
Savethanathorn, a suspicious fanpage, has withdrawn support from Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit for allegedly bringing the Future Forward Party (FFP) back into a cycle of conflict. The FFP told the press that the page was opened not long ago and several sources believe that it may be an information operation by the military.
On 7 March 2019, the Constitutional Court of Thailand ruled to dissolve the Thai Raksa Chart Party (TRC), claiming that the TRC’s nomination of former princess Ubolratana Mahidol as their candidate for Prime Minister was in opposition to the constitutional monarchy. To many, the verdict was not entirely unexpected. Nevertheless, the court’s ruling is another in a series of political earthquakes which have shaken Thailand in the period leading up to the general election on 24 March 2019, triggering a chain of reaction from the moment the verdict was delivered.
Prayut Chan-o-cha is losing the Thai pop culture war as the election date approaches. Anti-junta groups are not convinced by the junta leader’s choices of song, food, dress, musical instruments and his social media strategy as a whole, while other political parties have already moved on to serious campaign debates. Still, he has the upper hand because of the constitution written for him.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Multimedia

Infographic

Op-Ed

Pick to Post

Quote of the Day

The people must demand the right to election, and not only that demand, but also transparency and fainess[in the election]. Not just somebody, this country must belong to everyone.
บีบีซี ไทย