Highlight

2018-10-24 11:01
Turning back to answers from past Commanders-in-Chief of the Royal Thai Army when asked if there would be a coup d’état, Chalermchai insisted “there won’t be one”; Teerachai smiled but didn’t answer; Udomdej affirmed that there definitely wouldn’t be one; Prayut gave answers that started as chaotic to a question that can’t be answered and as we know, Anupong insisted that there definitely wouldn’t be one, and Sonthi said there probably wouldn’t be one before saying “some questions cannot be answered even after death”.
2018-10-18 09:45
Since Thailand declared war on drugs 15 years ago, harsh suppression measures have been imposed and at the same time proven themselves ineffective. The number of drug offences continues to rise. Given the limited resources of the Thai justice system, Thai prisons are overcrowded, and over 70 per cent of inmates are convicted for drugs. In March 2018, the Department of Corrections revealed that Thailand had 334,279 inmates, 247,344 of whom were convicted for drug offences and most are merely users or retailers while the drug lords are rarely punished.  
2018-10-11 17:23
Everyone around the world is becoming aware of artificial intelligence (AI) or robots because their ability is constantly developing and they are likely to replace many jobs in the near future.  What is the situation in Thailand?  Are workers losing their jobs?  Does Thai labour law provide adequate protection?  Is the government keeping up?  This report will take a look at the state of the problem and the calls for solutions.
2018-10-03 01:51
Overall there are about 37,340,000 Thais of working age, divided into: 1) about 2,842,000 government officials, or 7.6% of the total workforce; 2) about 10,940,000 private company employees (29.3%); and 3) about 21,300,000 workers in the non-formal sector (57%), of whom only 3,900,000 or 18.3% are in the social security system.
2018-08-14 19:50
15 years ago, Chit (alias) used a homemade rifle to shoot his sleeping stepfather in the head. Chit’s stepfather had looked after him since he was 2 years old and loved him like his own son. There were no disagreements between them. Chit shot his stepfather because he wanted to help him. He saw flashing lights near his stepfather’s head and he wanted to chase them away. At that time, he really believed that he should have done what he did.
2018-07-16 17:21
On 24 June 1932 at Thammasat University, Tha Prachan, the Thai Academic Network for Civil Rights (TANC) and the 24 June Democracy Group held a conference on “86 years since 1932: Branches and Fruit of Siam’s Great Revolution”   The conference had Assoc. Prof. Chaiyan Rajchagool, Faculty of Law, Chiang Mai University; Assoc. Prof. Anusorn Unno, Dean of the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University; Rawee Siri-issaranant (Wad Rawee), writer and owner of the Shine Publishing House; Assoc. Prof.
2018-07-13 13:58
On 24 June 1932 at Thammasat University, Tha Prachan, the Thai Academic Network for Civil Rights (TANC) and the 24 June Democracy Group held a conference on “86 years since 1932: Branches and Fruit of Siam’s Great Revolution”   The conference had Assoc. Prof. Chaiyan Rajchagool, Faculty of Law, Chiang Mai University; Assoc. Prof. Anusorn Unno, Dean of the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University; Rawee Siri-issaranant (Wad Rawee), writer and owner of the Shine Publishing House; Assoc. Prof.
2018-06-20 14:51
Last March, the Thai Immigration Police visited Henry’s apartment six times. Henry is a Nigerian MBA student, with a valid student visa. “They accosted me on my way to campus”, he said. “They went through my phone a couple of times during the harassment. They came into my room and searched through my wardrobes and desk drawers. They took photos of me and my room number”. According to Henry, his room was “ransacked”. Henry’s crime? He says it is simply being a black African. “To me, this is nothing less than racism and harassment.”  
2018-05-28 13:23
Tensions are rising at the UN office or ‘duty station’ in Bangkok over plans to slash salaries for the second time in six years.
2018-05-24 16:00
The case of the housing project for judiciary officials reflects the state’s monopoly on the use of resources. The people do not have rights. How can judiciary officials stay in forests while villagers cannot? Structural injustice is rooted in the law. Academics point out that this case was a statist type of resource management that ignores the people. The case of the housing project for judiciary officials reflects state monopoly and management of resources.

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