Opinion

9 Oct 2007
Attention was nailed on the crisis in Burma over the last couple of weeks and rightly so. The crisis in Burma has once again brought home the grim reality that powerful elites, with little to nil concern for international human rights standards, feel they can justify extreme measures in order to ensure their grip on power. The military junta's use of extreme violence against unarmed monks and civilians aspiring freedom and democracy clearly highlights their fear and cowardice and has aroused condemnation all over the world.
6 Oct 2007
Since the military coup of 19th September 2006, Thailand has almost caught up with China as a world leader in the field of internet censorship and control, particularly with regard to freedom of political expression. This is a completely unacceptable environment for the promised return to democracy at the end of this year.
4 Oct 2007
I was going to begin the series by expressing my views on our government's suffocation of internet freedom, but that will have to wait till next week. The present situation in Burma (officially called "Myanmar" by the governing military junta) requires me to urgently call upon our government (established by our own home-made military junta) to relinquish its wimpish "non-interference" position on the Burmese domestic situation, and tell the Burmese regime in no uncertain terms that any use of violence to crackdown on the peaceful mass demonstrations for democracy and social justice taking place all over country will be completely unacceptable to Thailand.
1 Oct 2007
While the mainstream media concentrate on the pronouncements of foreign governments and the role of the U.N. in stopping the bloodshed perpetrated by the Burmese junta, the real struggle is on the streets and in the cities around Burma.
25 Sep 2007
Council for National Security spokesperson Col Sansern Kaewkamnerd told reporters after a CNS meeting on Sept 17 that martial law would remain in force in 27 provinces including Pattani and those along the border; the number decreased from 35 previously. This might cheer up the urban middle class a little bit as a good sign of improvement in the situation, economic in particular.
21 Sep 2007
In early 2007, as a small number of highly placed members of theLao Communist Party's (ruling) Politburo stated to the press that theywould like to see an absolute end to logging inside the country'sconservation areas.
15 Sep 2007
...I begin with an illustration which reflects the condemnation and belittling of poor people all over the country. You may well remember this. Let's forget where it comes from, but try to interpret its meaning straightforwardly. 
1 Sep 2007
During 18 - 22 July 2007, Pornpen Kongkiatkachorn from the Working Group on Justice for Peace spoke at the training session for NGOs working on ethnic and human rights issues in the North. She related her experience in the past year as part of the Working Group on Justice for Peace which has shed light on discrimination that still exists in the justice system there. 
25 Aug 2007
This article wants to take the opinions on the referendum by people in Mukdahan province to argue against the claims put forward by the junta and its minions including politicians, academics, and the media, that northeasterners' are backward in politics, and against the superficial attitudes generally held by the urban middle class towards the rural poor.
18 Aug 2007
What reasons do we use in deciding to accept or reject the draft 2007 constitution? The reasons given both publicly and privately are numerous, but can be grouped into two main categories: those concerning the content of the draft charter and those concerning considering the context.
18 Aug 2007
Many Thais have their reasons to vote "Yes" for the 2007 constitution some see it as a shift of the gear towards the next election while others endorse it as part of the post-coup efforts to right the wrong things incurred during Thaksin regime. But whether it really ends there or a less polarized and less despoticpolitical environment emerge after Sunday referendum, there remains a certain degree of uncertainty.
15 Aug 2007
It is now obvious that the military junta have no intention of conducting a clean and democratic referendum on their new constitution. While the government is shamelessly spending millions of the public's baht on propaganda urging the population to vote "yes" and accept the constitution, those who are opposed to it are prevented from campaigning properly by arrests, threats and a total lack of access in the media.

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