Opinion

12 Jul 2016
If you think being a political prisoner in Thailand is already a nightmare, being an ordinary prisoner can be worse. A junta critic, accused of lèse majesté, has shared an experience after being rejected from visiting his cellmates just because they do not have a same surname.
30 Jun 2016
Rangsiman Rome is 1 of the 7 students who was arrested and is being detained as a result of campaigning around the constitutional referendum. He dictated this letter to Somkit Lertpaithoon to a friend who came to visit him at the prison.
22 Jun 2016
Having spent over 15 years under house arrest imposed by the military junta that ruled Myanmar until 2011, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi knows a thing or two about dealing with military men.
21 Jun 2016
As a Canadian Masters student who is researching development practices in Thailand, and works at Prachatai, I often hear and read about conflicts between authorities and activists. After observing interactions between the two groups this past weekend, from the explanations given by the authorities for their interventions at least, it seems like they are there just to help out! Let me explain.    There is an activist group called the New E-saan Movement, which is located in the northeast region of Isaan, in Thailand.
20 Jun 2016
Muslims all over the world are observing their religious duty of fasting during the holy month, Ramadan. Hostility being prohibited during this month, many people have the naive hope that the conflict situation in Patani, or the Muslim-majority southernmost provinces of Thailand, will improve at least temporarily.
26 May 2016
In January 2013, the Criminal Court convicted and sentenced a magazine editor to ten years in prison in Thailand. His crime was violation of the lèse majesté law by publishing and disseminating two articles. The court proved the guilt of the editor by asking witnesses to read the articles in question and interpret them for the court. Upon listening to the interpretation of these witnesses, the court concluded that the editor must have reached the same interpretation. Therefore, this indicated that the editor intended to defame the king by printing and disseminating the two articles.
19 May 2016
Abu Hafez Al-Hakim, a MARA Patani delegate discussed about the Terms of Reference (TOR) of the peace dialogue between Bangkok and MARA Patani, as umbreralla organization of the insurgent movements. The TOR, if endorsed, will kick start the official peace dialogue. 
10 May 2016
Second part of Hara Shintaro's analysis on the Pondok Jihad phenomena in Thailand's restive Deep South.
9 May 2016
The removal of a senior military officer who had played a key role in the Thai dialogue team in the southern peace talks, and the team's unreadiness to endorse the draft terms of reference (ToR), raise concerns about whether the process is facing a deadlock.   The technical teams of Party A, representing the Thai government, and Party B, a term defined as "people with different opinions from the state" and represented by Mara Patani, have spent several months working on the ToR.
1 May 2016
Every lawyer in the world must be shock by the news about the arrest without bail of the 8 victims who were charged of a computer crime against the national security for drawing a caricature of the Prime Minister and posted online.
25 Apr 2016
There is little to be gained from further interpretation and evaluation of Meechai Ruchuphan’s draft constitution. The drafters felt no need for concealment or obfuscation concerning who they want to hold power and who they would prevent from gaining power. On these points it is the clearest of any constitution we’ve ever had, so clear that interpretation is hardly needed.   The contents of the draft are not as interesting as are its intentions and political objectives.
19 Apr 2016
  Part 1: Chronology    It is not unusual for Patani Malay Muslims to receive a bilingual invitation card printed both in Thai and Malay (in Jawi script) for a fund raising tea party, usually organized by a local mosque, aimed at collecting donations from well-wishers. These events, called ‘makae the’ (drinking tea) in the local Malay dialect, are often held as one of the most effective traditional ways of public fund raising in the community.

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