Public Assembly Act

19 Aug 2021
The increasing wave of pro-democracy protests has been met with increasing use of force by the police in order to block marches and prevent demands being expressed in public. The police crowd control guidelines are being questioned as clashes attract public attention.
27 Dec 2020
The Thai government have always maintained that the measures they have taken against pro-democracy protests follow international procedures. Prachatai has talked to the UN Special Rapporteur to find out what these standards actually are.
25 Dec 2020
On Christmas day, the Criminal Court dismissed all charges against 9 activists who called for an election in front of the MBK department store in January 2018.
10 Sep 2020
A high school student has been summoned by the police for participating in an anti-government protest in Ratchaburi on 1 August and accused of violating the Emergency Decree and the Public Assembly Act.
17 Jan 2020
Tanawat Wongchai, one of the organisers of the “Run Against Dictatorship” in Bangkok, has been summoned by Bang Sue Police Station for organizing a public assembly without notifying the police according to the Public Assembly Act.
9 Jan 2020
Authorities have been attempting to block spin-off Run Against Dictatorship events in at least three provinces, while the main Bangkok event has been forced to move from Thammasat University to Wachirabenchathat (Rot Fai) Park.
3 Sep 2018
“Article 12. Political gatherings of five or more persons, shall be punished with imprisonment not exceeding six months or a fine not exceeding 10,000 baht, or both, unless permission has been granted by the Head of the NCPO or an authorized representative.”
2 May 2018
There are two main components of a public assembly, according to the Public Assembly Act of 2015 or the ‘assembly prohibition law’. The first relates to the type of ‘activity’ according to Article 3 [[1]], which states the kind of activities that fall within the scope of this law and which must be reported in advance to the responsible officials before they are eligible for protection and facilitation for the assembly to take place.
20 Mar 2018
Seven individuals have been prosecuted in Pattaya for joining a pro-election protest in early March.
8 Feb 2018
The 39 pro-election protesters have reported to the police to hear the charges against them. The courts released them without bail.     On 8 February 2018, 34 out of the 39 pro-election protesters known as the MBK 39 reported to Pathumwan Police Station to hear the charges against them. The junta accused the group of joining a public assembly on 27 January within 150 meters of a royal site, in violation of Article 7 of the 2015 Public Assembly Act.
7 Feb 2018
A network of Thai scholars has launched a fundraising campaign to seek two million baht to bail the 39 pro-election protesters. The junta has also filed another charge against them of violating the ban on political gatherings.   On 6 February 2018, Nuttha Mahattana, one of the protesters, revealed that the group has to find over 2,000,000 baht as bail for the 39.
31 Jan 2018
Bangkok police have summoned 39 participants in last weekend’s political campaign, which urged the junta to step down.

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