red shirts

18 Jun 2010
The dusts from the melee of fleeing Red Shirts and assaulting teams of soldiers have settled, and not even the hint of smoke from the burned buildings could be detected. Bangkok’s residents are now trying to pick up on the routines of their daily lives before the red-shirted protesters mounted mass actions in large sections of central Bangkok from March to May.  But for the Thai’s intellectuals, this seeming lull is a chance to take a more in-depth look at the recent past events and deal with nagging issues that confront Thai society.  
17 Jun 2010
In a cabinet meeting on 15 June, ICT Minister Chuti Krairoek reported about websites containing lèse majesté contents. He said that Jakrapob Penkair and Giles Ungpakorn are still active in conveying information through websites in Europe. Meanwhile, the Ministry of ICT found a group of 200 people that constantly posts LM messages online, which is against the law. Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva has urged ICT Minister Chuti to negotiate with the people related to the websites according to the National Reconcilation Roadmap.
8 Jun 2010
The article “Is this government violating human rights? Think again” by Arie Bloed published in the Bangkok Post on 3 June 2010 raises many important points.
8 Jun 2010
Clip of paramedic Keng talking about the incident at Pathumwanaram Temple where 6 people were shot dead on 19 May, with English subtitle.  Read about the little guy and the female paramedic mentioned in the clip here and here. 
8 Jun 2010
Somyot Pruksakasemsuk, a veteran labour activist and editor of Voice of Taksin magazine, has written to the National Human Rights Commission, calling on the body to look into his case. He and Chulalongkorn history lecturer Dr Suthachai Yimprasert reported to the CRES on 21 May, and were sent to be held in custody at a military camp in Saraburi.  They were denied the right to see lawyers. Suthachai was released on 1 May, but Somyot has still remained in detention.  Several labour groups in Thailand and other countries have been campaigning to call for his release.
28 May 2010
CRES spokesperson Col Sansern Kaewkamnerd said that Chulalongkorn academic Suthachai Yimprasert had the right to go on a hunger strike, which must make him hungry, but insisted that the CRES was authorized to detain him under the Emergency Decree.
28 May 2010
On 23 May, hundreds of red shirts from various districts of Kalasin, Sakon Nakhon and Mukdahan attended the funeral of Akkaradej Khankaew, or the ‘small person’, one of six people killed during the carnage in Pathumwanaram Temple on 19 May.
27 May 2010
Kamolkade Akkahad was 25 when she was shot dead inside Pathumwanaram Temple on 19 May.  She was called Kade by her friends, but was Moo (pig) to her family members, as she ate a lot and was plump, according to her mother.
27 May 2010
SPIEGEL correspondent Thilo Thielke was in Bangkok the day the Thai Army cleared the Red Shirt camps. It was the last day he would work with his friend and colleague, Italian photojournalist Fabio Polenghi, who died from a gunshot wound.
26 May 2010
(New York, May 25, 2010) – The Thai government should set up an independent commission to carry out a prompt, comprehensive, and impartial investigation into abuses by all sides during the recent protests and hold accountable all those found responsible, Human Rights Watch said today.
22 May 2010
According to Mr. Sarayuth Ampan who was shot by firearm into his arm while hiding himself in the rear part of the white medic van with clear signs, some demonstrators who had started to gather around Bon Kai area on Rama IV Road were running away into Soi Ngam Du Plee, off Rama IV Road. The army officials were chasing after them. As the demonstrators had gone into other smaller lanes, the army officials approached the Pinnacle Hotel’s parking lot where the medic van was parked with its head facing the road.
22 May 2010
As some hardline red shirts vowed to go underground to fight a violent war against the government and the old elite, other, pro-peace red shirts met to discuss how to carry on the struggle peacefully. Sombat Boon-ngam-anong, a key member of the red-shirt movement who led protests from a minor stage in the Din Daeng area for a few nights after the main protest site was cordoned off by the military before the crackdown on Wednesday, said he had met with some 300-plus red shirts on Thursday to discuss the future of a peaceful struggle.

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