Section 44 of 2014 Interim Constitution

8 Apr 2015
Oh what a relief.  No longer do we have to fear the knock on the door from martial law officers at some ungodly hour of the night.  Nor should we worry any more about the hooded journey under martial law to an anonymous military facility where we will be held without charge or trial.  And we are now free from the terrible prospect of seven days’ detention under martial law while we have our attitudes forcibly adjusted without the possibility of consulting our family or friends or lawyers or even seeking support and solace from them.
8 Apr 2015
Human rights groups denounced the Thai junta’s new law which broadens its authority in all branches of governance, saying that it is against democracy and human rights.   
7 Apr 2015
On 20 March 2015, martial law, which had been in force since May 2014, was finally revoked. However, instead of returning Thailand to civilian rule as it had promised, the Thai junta replaced martial law with its new protocol, Section 44 of the Interim Charter, which significantly broadens its authority while still retaining the power to crush political dissents with arrests and detentions.
3 Apr 2015
It is a rare occasion when the lifting of martial law is met with unprecedented alarm and condemnation. Yet, this is exactly what happened when the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) lifted Martial Law on 1 April, after being in place for more than 10 months in Thailand.
3 Apr 2015
The professional membership of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand (FCCT) shares the concerns expressed by four Thai media organisations over the new powers announced by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) under Article 44 of the interim constitution, as outlined in the report below posted on 2 April on the website of broadcaster Thai PBS.   The new order gives military officers sweeping powers to censor the media, with harsh punishments possible for journalists deemed not to be in compliance.
3 Apr 2015
The European Union Spokesman on Thursday criticized the junta's replacement of martial law with Section 44 of the interim charter.    "The EU has repeatedly called for martial law to be lifted and the democratic process to be restored in Thailand. The replacement of martial law by Order Number 3/2015 does not bring Thailand closer to democratic and accountable government.    Military courts should not be used to try civilians.
2 Apr 2015
GENEVA (2 April 2015) – UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein on Thursday expressed alarm at the Thai military Government’s announcement that it has invoked an article of the Interim Constitution that bestows unfettered authority on the head of the military government.
2 Apr 2015
Thai Lawyers for Human Rights’ Fact Sheet The consequences of revocation of Martial Law and the Order of the Head of National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) No. 3/2558 (2015) 1.      Martial Law is still imposed in areas which have been under Martial Law prior to 20 May 2015 for instance the southern border provinces; Pattani, Yala, Narathiwat, 4 districts in Songkhla, and other border provinces
2 Apr 2015
Martial Law as anounced on 20 May 2014 was lifted on Wednesday night and was immediately replaced by Order number 3/2558 (3/2015) issued by General Prayuth Chan-ocha in his capacity as Head of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO).

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