Universal Periodic Review (UPR)

31 Mar 2021
For the 3rd cycle of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), to be held in November 2021, Scholars at Risk (SAR) has submitted a report to the Working Group, detailing the worsening situation for academic freedom and freedom of expression in Thailand.
27 Mar 2021
This November, the Thai government will have to answer all concerns expressed by UN Members over human rights violations in the country. For the 3rd cycle of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), student groups in Thailand have submitted a report to the Working Group, revealing that the Thai government has not delivered on the promises made to the international community 5 years ago.
3 Mar 2021
So before we have to appear at this UPR thing at the UN, … What’s UPR? Ah yes, being police you wouldn’t know.  Universal Periodic Review.  Every member of UN comes up every 4 years or so and gets questioned on their human rights record.  We’re up soon so we want to be able to respond to the inevitable questions about crowd control. None of their business.  Our internal affair.  As true Thais we will not be lectured on … Yes, yes.  But it’s part of being in the UN.  We have to do it and embarrassing as it is, we have to be ready with some plausible answers.
6 Aug 2019
Manushya Foundation, CIVICUS and the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) call on the Government of Lao PDR to remove all unwarranted restrictions on civic space in the country ahead of its human rights review to be held at the United Nations (UN) in January-February 2020. The review will mark five years since UN member states made 33 recommendations to the Lao government that directly relate to barriers to open civic space. As of today, the government has partially implemented only three recommendations.
29 Jul 2019
Manushya Foundation and Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) call on the Government of Lao PDR to guarantee that development projects and investments are respectful of rights of individuals and communities, particularly rural and indigenous ethnic groups, in the country with effective remedy for harms when they occur.
30 Aug 2018
Thailand: Call on the Government to be sincere and transparent in the drafting process of the National Action Plan on Business & Human RightsWith Respect to the process and content
13 Mar 2017
Thailand’s worsening human rights record will expose the military junta to further international embarrassment during a review by a United Nations (UN) human rights body, FIDH and its member organizations Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) and Internet Law Reform Dialogue (iLaw) said today.
23 Sep 2016
FIDH (International Federation for Human Rights)   and its member organizations in Thailand   Union for Civil Liberty (UCL)   and   Internet Law Reform Dialogue (
19 May 2016
Paris, Bangkok, 18 May 2016: The Thai government deceived the international community with regard to the real human rights situation in the country during the UN-backed Universal Periodic Review (UPR), held in Geneva, Switzerland, on 11 May 2016, FIDH, its member organization Union for Civil Liberty (UCL), and its partner organization Internet Law Reform Dialogue (iLaw) said today.
16 May 2016
Well that was a right farce last Wednesday in Geneva, eh?  Talk about a dialogue of the deaf. I am of course referring to Thailand’s starring role in the latest episode in the UPR saga of the UNHRC.  And for those who don’t follow the arcane acronyms of international human rights (so how the hell did you get to this website?), let me explain that it was Thailand’s turn to sit in the naughty chair and face a barrage of questions and recommendations about how to improve its human rights record.
12 May 2016
Giggles were heard Wednesday, 11 May 2016, at a panel discussion and viewing of Phase Two of Thailand’s Universal Periodic Review by the United Nations at Black Box Café and Bar Ploenchit, during the opening remarks by a Thai Government representative. The tone of the day had been set.   The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a mechanism of the United Nations to assure transparent practice of human rights, which operates in a five year cycle.
12 May 2016
Amid international concerns on the abuse of Thailand’s lèse majesté law, the Thai Justice Minister said other countries did not understand that the law is necessary for Thailand since they did not have civilization, sensitivity, and gentleness.   Gen Paiboon Koomchaya, the Minister of Justice, said in having the King, Thailand was unique and civilized.

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