T(h)aksin?

A red-shirt magazine issued during the New Year has a feature article about Thaksin and King Taksin, who rescued Siam from the Burmese over 200 hundred years ago.  ASTV-Manager finds this a serious affront to the current dynasty.

ASTV-Manager reported on 1 Jan about the latest issue of the red-shirt bi-weekly Voice of Taksin.

On the front cover is a picture of the King Taksin Monument at Wongwian Yai on the Thon Buri side of the Chao Phraya River, with the headline ‘Cyclical karma of history, Taksin returns’, while the back cover shows a picture of Thaksin Shinawatra.

According to the ASTV-Manager report, the 6-page feature article, written under a pen name [which can be translated as Musketeer of Thon Buri, which King Taksin established as the capital in his reign and is now part of Bangkok] tells of the skills of the King and his tragic end, when he was killed together with all his family members.

The official history taught in schools says that King Taksin went insane and was the cause of chaos in the country.  His short-lived dynasty was replaced by the current Chakri dynasty.  His tragic end has evoked sympathy in the hearts of Thais for over 200 years.  Some independent academics, who are sceptical of the history of the victors, have conducted research and believe that King Taksin was not insane and his throne was seized in a coup, the magazine article says. 

The article goes on to say that King Taksin has not been granted his due honour by the Chakri dynasty, and there has been an attempt to erase the name Krung Thon Buri [Thon Buri capital] from the memory of the people. 

In the article, Thaksin is found to have some similarities to King Taksin; they are both northerners, have Chinese origins, rescued the country from great crises (Burmese and IMF occupations), and have similar names.

The article says that the Abhisit government has tried to accuse the red shirts of plotting a ‘Taksin 2’ plan to overthrow the regime, but without evidence so far.

Towards the end, the article also says that the late former Prime Minister Khuang Abhaiwongse, a founding member and the first leader of the Democrat Party, descended from Chao Phraya Abhai Phubes (Ban) who joined the coup that toppled King Taksin.

‘Political conflicts in Thailand still reflect and connect to the history of King Taksin.  And who knows when these will ever end, and who will be the next victims?  Will the deeds of the past be avenged?  2010 will provide the answer to the cyclical karma of Taksin,’ the article says.

A photograph of Pheua Phaen Din Party leader and Industry Minister Charnchai Chairungruang appears on page 69, together with his New Year blessing to the Thais.  

ASTV-Manager says that the Voice of Taksin magazine is affiliated with the red-shirt TV station, called D-station, which is based at Imperial World Lad Phrao Department Store.  It lists the names of many red-shirt leaders and Thaksin’s aides as executives of the magazine.

Source: 

http://www.manager.co.th/Politics/ViewNews.aspx?NewsID=9520000161056

I don't imagine that Sin of

I don't imagine that Sin of Tak had other than his own interests in mind when he put the pieces of the Siamese empire back together and extended them.

Nor do I believe that Thaksin of Chiangmai had other than his own interests in mind when he stormed into the premiership of Thailand by popular election.

Both of them were evidently astute opportunists, able to amass the popular support necessary to accomplish their own ends.

But let us meditate on just what Thailand would look like after the re-installation of a Thaksin regime. Remember what his last go was like? Ugh... that's enough.

The return of Thaksin is the worst thing imaginable... other than the continued despotic reign of the putsch. For progress seems impossible in Thailand while the putsch hangs onto power, forestalling a return to democratically elected governments.

poor JFL waiting for

poor JFL

waiting for utopia.............

democracy is not perfect, its just the long term average best system we have been able to invent

the politicians that are chosen by the people are never perfect, its just they are chosen by the people which is better than any other process

so learn to live with the peoples choices, made regularly every x years........

maybe you will find utopia when you die?

the politicians that are

  1. the politicians that are chosen by the people are never perfect, its just they are chosen by the people which is better than any other process

    No problem there... that was the topic of my "lament".

  2. so learn to live with the peoples choices, made regularly every x years...

    The problem is that we are being "taught to live" with a putsch put in place in defiance of 1 above : chosen by the military after their coup, which put in place a law nullifying the government chosen by the people, which law was then retroactively applied by the courts to bring down that elected government.

As PPT says... สู้ต่อไป!

JFL, so what is your

JFL, so what is your point?
If we dont like the choices that people make after every x years - what we could do is to engage in a debate/dialogue, make open information - as to why we do not like the choices made...or try to make better options possible.
But all this would take time. And we would have to acknowledge that it takes time.
If we try to get help from outside for 'quick fix' solutions - then it kind of unravels everything, does it not?

Thaksin was not good for

Thaksin was not good for Thailand. He was authoritarian himself. He killed thousands of people in his "war on drugs", with the police acting as judge, jury, and executioners.

Thaksin was responsible for the Tak Bai massacre . Somchai Neelaphaiji disappeared under Thaksin. Phra Supoj Suvajo was brutally murdered in A.Fang, J.Chiangmai by a gang with links to "a national politician" when Thaksin was the number one national politician.

Thaksin enriched himself at the expense of the Thai people and nation.

Thaksin intimidated journalists who wrote about his double dealings.

Thaksin was a bad actor, yet in comparison with the alternatives, the people of Thailand preferred Thaksin because he was willing to share the loot, which was more then the rest had ever done.

The anti-Thaksin outrage rose up from the "middle class" in Bangkok... but rather than address the long-overdue concerns that Thaksin acknowledged and serviced to some extent they dug in their heels in reaction.

Thaksin is still an actor, bigger than ever maybe at this point, due to the reactionary right in Bangkok.

The choices are not good and will not get better until the people themselves get involved, hands on, and stop leaving it up to the corrupt political class. This is the same situation as in my own country, the USA.

Presently the reactionaries in power in Thailand are forestalling elections, knowing full well they'll be swept from office if and when elections do occur. The PAD is on record as opposing representative democracy itself, and their point of view is the central within the putsch even as their trademark personalities' are falling out of favor.

In short no progress has been made because the fight is all over the spoils of power. No politicians are interested in the longterm welfare of the Thai people and Thai land. The Democrats present priority, always after hanging onto power itself at all costs, is re-enabling the poisonous, cosmodemonic industrialization of Thailand.

If I were a Thai I would vote Red, but with no illusions about the interests of the Red "leadership", because the alternative is utter stasis with no elections at all.

But the answer in Thailand is grassroots organization, just as it is in the USA.

IMO, JFL has it about right

IMO, JFL has it about right (this time:)

In my utopia, the reds as well as the yellows (and whites) would be on the streets to keep a Thaksin (or Abhisit) in check, but thats the political side of things - who keeps the military (current & retired generals) in check when they are not under control of the elected government?