Article 112

11 Jun 2014
  Two men were charged with lèse majesté after being detained for seven days by the military. The court denied their bail requests.    On Tuesday, police charged Chaleaw J. and Kathawut B. under Article 112 of the Criminal Code or the lèse majesté law. They were denied bail and sent to Bangkok Remand Prison.     They were among 28 people summoned by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) under order no. 44, issued on June 1.
3 Jun 2014
  The police arrested a taxi driver on Monday and charged him with lèse majesté after a passenger filed a police complaint over their conversation on inequality in Thai society.    The passenger, reportedly a university lecturer, recorded the conversation between them in January on his mobile phone and submitted it to the police as evidence.     The 43-year-old taxi driver is now detained at the Phaya Thai police station.     
2 Jun 2014
  The Criminal Court on Monday for the second time rejected a bail request of Apichat (last name withheld due to privacy concerns).
1 Jun 2014
It has become increasingly clear over the past week since the imposition of Martial Law nationwide followed by the coup that one of Thailand’s most draconian and abused laws, the lèse majesté law or Article 112 of the Penal Code, is being used to persecute anyone who voices opposition to the coup.
25 May 2014
The National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) issued a 37th announcement, granting authority to the Army Court to prosecute all crimes in violation of  Article 107-112 of the Criminal Code, or the crimes against the monarchy including Thailand's lese majeste law. Crimes regarding national security and sedition as stipulated in Article 113-118 of the Criminal Code will also be prosecuted by the Military Court.  
21 May 2014
  The Thai Criminal Court found Thitinan K. guilty of lèse majesté and sentenced her to one year in jail, but suspended the jail term for three years because the defendant suffered from mental illness. 
13 May 2014
The Thai Appeal Court on May 8 affirmed the decision of the Court of First Instance, sentencing Ekkachai H. to three years and four months in jail and a fine of 66,666 baht for selling VCDs of a documentary on the Thai royal succession by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and copies of Wikileaks cables. 
1 May 2014
The Thai Appeal Court on Thursday upheld the verdict of the Court of First Instance, sentencing Yotwarit Chuklom aka Jeng Dokjik, a comedian turned red-shirt activist and politician to two years in jail for lèse majesté, without suspended jail term.    The court found Yotwarit guilty of lèse majesté for a speech and a gesture, at a red-shirt United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship (UDD) rally on 28 March 2010.    The 2010 red-shirt demonstration was to pressure the then Prime Minister
29 Apr 2014
Paris-Bangkok-Geneva, April 29, 2014. Thailand must release labour rights activist Somyot Prueksakasemsuk and promote a free, open, and informed public debate on lèse-majesté, FIDH and OMCT, within the framework of the Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders, and Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) said today. On April 30, Somyot, a UCL member and the former editor of the Voice of Taksin magazine, will mark three years in jail.
26 Apr 2014
On the Occasion of the International Thai Studies Conference, Sydney, Australia, 24 April 2014

Pages

Subscribe to Article 112